Ottawa looking ‘very carefully’ at marijuana-ticket proposal

September 05, 2013
Aug 29 2013 OTTAWA - Stephen Harper says his government is looking “very carefully” at a proposal that would give the police the power to ticket – rather than charge – people who are caught with small amounts of marijuana. “I don’t believe the Canadian Chiefs of Police proposed these options because they don’t believe in the laws,” Mr. Harper said. “On the contrary, they believe this option is a better approach in terms of enforcement of the law and the government is certainly looking at their proposal very carefully.” The Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police passed a resolution earlier this month that calls for changes to the federal Contraventions Act so that police can issue fines for individuals in possession of small amounts of cannabis. The proposal would not take any existing laws off the books, but would add a new ticketing power.

Aug 29 2013

OTTAWA - Stephen Harper says his government is looking “very carefully” at a proposal that would give the police the power to ticket – rather than charge – people who are caught with small amounts of marijuana.

“I don’t believe the Canadian Chiefs of Police proposed these options because they don’t believe in the laws,” Mr. Harper said. “On the contrary, they believe this option is a better approach in terms of enforcement of the law and the government is certainly looking at their proposal very carefully.”

The Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police passed a resolution earlier this month that calls for changes to the federal Contraventions Act so that police can issue fines for individuals in possession of small amounts of cannabis. The proposal would not take any existing laws off the books, but would add a new ticketing power.

The chiefs argue this would neither be decriminalization nor legalization, but rather an improvement on the status quo in which police must choose between ignoring a situation or laying criminal charges. The chiefs say laying charges for pot strains police and court resources. The police also note that convictions for pot possession carry heavy consequences for individuals – including potential barriers to travel and employment – that would be avoided with tickets.

There is constant debate over the definitions of decriminalization and legalization when it comes to pot, but some have said the chiefs’ proposal amounts to a form of decriminalization.

Tim Smith, a spokesperson and government relations official for the police association, said he was pleasantly surprised to hear the Prime Minister’s remarks.

“I thought he was right on. He was obviously very knowledgeable. Someone had briefed him. I’d like to pretend it was us, and it wasn’t,” he said.

Mr. Smith said the effect of implementing the proposal would be a reduction in the number of cannabis possession cases in the criminal justice system.

“There is the fact that there’s a lot of people that have been perhaps unfairly criminalized and our court systems and our police officers are being plugged up with it, and that’s one of the major themes behind our proposal was just the efficiencies of the policing system and the justice system in Canada,” he said.

Alberta Premier Alison Redford rejected the proposal from the police chiefs this month, calling marijuana a “gateway drug” that could lead individuals to harder drugs.

Meanwhile, Reuters reported Thursday that U.S. Attorney-General Eric Holder informed the governors of Colorado and Washington that the Obama administration has decided not to sue the states over new laws that legalized recreational marijuana use.

(Globe and Mail)

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