2FA allows officers to use their mobile devices to authenticate with the police department’s database, while UEM gives IT total control over the department’s mobile fleet, all from a single screen.
PPSS introduces their new bullet resistant vest that offers protection again full-contact shots and TASER probes. The new vests meet NIJ Std 0101.06 Level IIIA standards, and have passed both the German Police and FBI Body Armour Test Protocol. Offering protection from Tokarev Ball 7.62 x 25mm and Makarov 9 x 18mm, handgun rounds, the hybrid ballistic resistant package uses a new highly advanced ultra-resilient European ballistic material that provides better user comfort, improved flexibility and substantially reduced Back-Face Deformation (BFD). 
The Taker B50 is FoxFury’s most powerful aftermarket ballistic shield light, featuring CREE LED technology with 1,000 lumens of light and 5-10 hours of runtime. The Taker B50 is controlled by a single programmable (Quick - on/off or Strategic - Temporary, Turbo Strobe or Solid-On) pressure switch for more versatility. Powered by three or six CR123 batteries, the Taker B50 is a durable ballistic shield light which can be attached to any ballistic shield using Velcro® Industrial Strength Fasteners.
MPH Industries introduces the new BEE III directional speed radar, now available in a more affordable K-band version. It is the most compact radar available, featuring larger easier-to-read LED characters in the smallest detachable display for more mounting options and versatility. The slim K-band patch antennas take up less horizontal space so they provide discrete mounting options. Special features include patented Automatic Same Direction (ASD) technology for better accuracy in a wider range of situations.
Scotch Brand Extreme Fasteners, using 3M Dual Lock Technology have three times the holder power of Velcro® Industrial Strength Fasteners. Scotch Extreme Fasteners click together to securely hold heavy items under conditions where Velcro fasteners may separate. They resist wear and tear and withstand even the harshest conditions once locked together. Rated up to 4.5kg (10 lbs).
Teel Technologies Canada offers a variety of digital forensic training courses, tools, and services. Our courses cover advanced forensics, as well as tool-specific training. Visit us online to view our current course offerings, which include; ISP, JTAG, Chip-Off, Flasher Box / Bootloader, SQLite, and more. Our expert instructors provide you with in-depth training that goes beyond standard acquisition and analysis.
Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure has launched Intergraph® InSight Explorer, a self-serve, web-based crime mapping and analysis application for law enforcement agencies. Intergraph InSight Explorer empowers agencies to discover, analyze and visualize complete crime, incident and operational data through clearer presentation of complex information, uncovering trends and patterns that assist investigations and improve resource allocations.
The Torrey Pines T15 mini-thermal imager offers unique 3 to 8 X optical zoom in a tiny package with on‑board image enhancement, video and photo recording, multiple display views, flexible mounting options, USB port with power input and software updates. Powered by 2X CR123 batteries. This 9Hz unit is ideal for surveillance under a variety of conditions.
The STORM (GNT-235L2MF4) LED flashlight has multiple output modes to serve a wide range of uses. It’s versatile, easy to control, and fast with its tactical operation button and twist mode switching. It features a CREE LED powered by 2X CR123A batteries, food for up to 235 lumens. Run-time is: 3hrs at 100%, 15hrs at 10% or SOS Flashing, and 8hrs at quick-flashing.
Mitsubishi Outlander GT S-AWC. At Mitsubishi, we don’t provide the best warranty in the game because we have to – we do it because we can. An unmatched combination of quality and durability means you can rest assured that you’re making the best decision when you add a Mitsubishi to your fleet. http://www.mitsubishi-motors.ca/fleet
Safariland announces the release of their new PROTECH Tactical Fast Attack Vest outfitted with the FirstSpear® Tubes™ Closure System. This new closure system allows users to put-on and remove their Fast Attack Vest using a single-handed down or up movement to connect the front and rear panels. This system is ideal during stressful emergency situations and ensures proper positioning and fit every time.http://www.safariland.com/
TestReadyPro.com is the recognized leader in professional recruitment preparation for Emergency Service Candidates and Military Employment Transition; Ontario Police Recruits - PATI, WCT Tests, BPAD PREP for C.O.R, RCMP, CBSA, Corrections, Special Constable GATB, Forces CFAT/eCFAT, Paramedic and Firefighter candidates, Ontario Security Guard, Private Investigator plus Application, Resume and Interview preparation for entry level and supervisor candidates.http://testreadypro.com/ 
I recall my number ONE Breathalyzer test. This is “the biggy” that every breath tech worries about because you can imagine what the defence lawyer could do when they found out that this is — THE FIRST.
The use of hand-held recorders, desk-top microphones, ceiling mounted microphones, video cameras and even multiple microphone setups is common in today’s interview settings. The type of recording equipment can vary depending on budget and of course the room itself.
With a New Year upon us, it’s time to reflect on new changes and new beginnings for police services across Canada.
This book should be on the “must-read” list for all police officers and their partners and other adult family members. For officers it will help them understand why they often feel the way they do, and for partners and family members it will help them understand why the officer in their lives behaves the way he or she does. Police managers and administrators would also be well advised to read this book to better understand and deal with the emotional dangers their personnel face during their careers.
Reading retired OPP Commissioner Chris Lewis's new book on leadership brought back a lot of memories about the good, bad and indifferent leaders I served under during my career.
As I watch the ongoing public controversy about street-checks (aka “carding”) run-on like Niagara Falls, I’m often stuck by the statistical data typically quoted by the mainstream media and other critics, who claim that the practice is inherently biased against certain identifiable groups.
Our annual Supply & Services Guide is always a good starting point to shop for uniforms, equipment and supplies.
In much of Canada, snow and freezing temperatures are the norm from November through March, give or take a few weeks and the occasional random storm.
They were called “police” cars but they weren’t, really Looking over the materials for this month’s cover story, our annual Best Dressed Police Vehicle contest, makes me reflect, reminisce (and cringe) at my memories of the sad state of affairs that police cars once were. When I joined the then Metropolitan Toronto Police Force as a cadet back in 1979, I was assigned to the Summons Bureau, where my daily duties consisted of delivering outstanding parking tickets to often unwilling recipients. I was shocked to discover that my ride for the first few months at least, was a bright yellow marked Ford Pinto two-door that had seen better days, sometime well before my arrival. Nagging in the back of my mind of course was also the propensity for the Pinto’s to explode into a ball of fire when rear-ended. For a time afterwards I was assigned a brand-new metallic brown unmarked AMC Spirit. It’s not surprising that AMC went out of business, considering how poorly designed and built, and uncomfortable that Spirit was. One could easily get sea-sick if relegated to the front passenger seat because the ride was so soft. During my final six months or so my regular ride was upgraded to a brand-new marked Ford Fairmont four-door sedan with a relatively rare six-cylinder engine (most others only had the inline-four). Without roof-lights of any kind, the car was mistaken for a taxi on more than one occasion. After turning 21 and being sworn in as a constable I was sent off to recruit training at the Ontario Police College in Aylmer Ontario. During field training and then after graduation I finally got to move up to a “real” police car, although real would soon get tempered by the reality of what that was, or more accurately, wasn’t. In an apparent attempt to save money, we continued to get still more Ford Fairmonts (mostly with four-cylinder engines that stalled if one attempted a quick 3-point turn). Some of these actually had A/C, but the vinyl benches persisted, presenting a challenge when 2 officers of largely different stature had to share the car for a shift. The taller officer typically drove so they didn’t have to sit with their knees rubbing against the dashboard all night long. The Fairmonts were replaced quite quickly once their complete unsuitability for police work was realised. We then got mostly Plymouth Caravelle/Gran Fury’s equipped with an anemic slant-six mated to a four-speed automatic transmission. They had vinyl bench seats, untinted manual windows, no A/C, and no police equipment other than an antique GE police radio. Roof-lights consisted of six large red incandescent tractor-lights mounted on a primitive roof rack that howled-up a storm at highway speeds. Our traffic colleagues were at least lucky because they had actual real sirens – beautiful long cylindrical chrome units, while we divisional guys got saddled with cheap European-style two-tone “mee-maw” horns that created more confusion with the public then clearing the way for us during emergencies. There was also no prisoner partition and there was nowhere to put portable radios, so officers quickly improvised and pried the dash-vents out, wedging the portable radio into the resulting hole, which was a surprisingly good fit. We eventually got basic wire-mesh partitions, A/C and tinted windows, electronic sirens and in the late 80’s a MDT. Thankfully Dodge ended production of the Caravelle/Gran Fury’s (so we couldn’t buy them anymore) and we finally got full-sized Ford LTD’s and a few Chevy Impalas. With that we got V8s, tinted power windows, commercially built partitions and roof-lights and the Panasonic ToughBook computer. We also got a proper centre console with a mobile radio, proper siren and PA controls, and even coffee cup holders. Before retiring last year, I marvelled at how far police cars had come during my years of service. Now equipped with all the usual creature comforts, plus state of the art mobile computers, GPS, shotguns/patrol rifles, in-car cameras, stylish decal packages and all proper commercially made equipment. Car manufacturers have also stepped-up quite nicely over those years, providing a wide range of police-specific features and equipment in their police-package offerings, instead of just bolting heavy-duty everything onto regular cars and selling them as “police” cars. Another thing that has changed a lot over the years is the implementation of joint management and employee equipment committees that brought enlightened and progressive thinking to the fleet procurement and equipment process. User input has gone a long way towards fielding real “police cars” and professional equipment for all. Enjoy the rides, and this issue.
The Canadian public’s expectation is that police officers will work and live within established legal frameworks and at a higher standard than other members of the communities they serve. Those parameters should not be cast aside as they are now in some – albeit limited numbers of cases, when officers drive while impaired.
Police had a duty to enter an apartment to check on its occupant’s safety during a domestic abuse call.
As the first police officer on the scene of a serious motor vehicle collision in 2004, Brian Knowler worked frantically to save the life of a seriously injured driver while awaiting the ambulance.

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