Panasonic has launched the 2018 version of its 2-in-1 detachable laptop, the Toughbook 20. At 3.9 pounds, this fully rugged laptop is suited for today’s workers on-the-go, the company says.
Xplore’s ruggedized, mobile law enforcement tablet PCs move easily from the patrol car to any situation where the police can safely record information and access secure CJIS information. With in-vehicle and mobile wireless connectivity, Xplore’s vibration-resistant and extreme temperature-resistant tablets survive the patrol environment, according to the company, and feature ID barcode scanners as well as E-citation abilities.
Ganz Security’s LightGuard flashlight camera/recorder is an IP66-rated, 1080p portable camera and flashlight that incorporates switchable far/near LED light, IR lighting, an onboard screen for local playback and an SD card for recording. It also has an emergency notification alarm for additional safety and an RFID reader capability for route patrol recording.
Information Builders has launched its Accelerators, a set of pre-configured analytical capabilities. These vertical-specific accelerators — including one for law enforcement — provide data management, integration and analytics necessary to explore data and answer common industry questions. The Accelerator helps agencies “identify key trends and various risk factors through a variety of predefined content that allows officials to understand the dynamics and relationships between diverse data points.”
LensPen says its molecular carbon cleaning technology is now available in a new line specially designed for law enforcement. LensPen is used to clean scopes and night vision goggles of tactical units, lenses on forensic photographers’ cameras, even the lenses on dashboard and body cameras. The technology consists of a retractable natural brush at one end and a cleaning tip at the other. Every time you twist the cap back on, the carbon in the cleaning tip is recharged and each product will provide more than 500 cleanings, according to the company.
DT Research’s vehicle mount tablet solution includes a 12.5-inch, full HD display tablet with a slim folding keyboard cradle. The IP65 military standard DT325T tablet can be used in and out of vehicles or wall mounted. It was designed with support for Windows Hello face authentication and optional 4K Ultra HD displays. The tablet includes DT Research’s hot-swappable battery pack to avoid downtime in time-critical situations as well as an optional camera, RFID reader, GNSS, 2D barcode scanner and optional mobile broadband connection.
Mobile Innovations says its solution for secure mobile data is now available, in the form of a fully-loaded Darta Fleet Solutions Dodge Enforcer, featuring Samsung DeX Station with USB, HDMI and Ethernet connections.
To see all of Axon's law enforcement products, visit ca.axon.com.
Roshel Defence Solutions has introduced its new Observation and Video Surveillance Armoured Vehicle based on Toyota Land Cruiser V8 (J200) and specifically designed to provide border patrol and law enforcement agencies with “observation, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities to facilitate their missions in various terrains.”  
MSAB has announced the expansion of its mobile forensic ecosystem solution with the addition of one new product and improvements to three existing ones, which will give law enforcement agencies new capabilities to:
DJI has unveiled AeroScope, its new solution to identify and monitor airborne drones with existing technology that can address safety, security and privacy concerns.
B-Cam Ltd., a supplier of body-worn security cameras, has unveiled its new Compact camera.
I’ve been watching Stranger Things and the German science fiction/horror series Dark on Netflix over the past few months and thoroughly enjoying whenever one of the retro police cars or trucks whizzes (or putts, as with that circa 1953 fir green Volkswagen police beetle in Dark) across the screen.
Mental Health Awareness: Self-Care for First RespondersBy Stephanie Miloknay and Marc Laferriere; 2017, 128 pagesISBN: 978-1-77255-252-2
I want to draw attention to a Calgary Police pilot project started in May 2017 to combat the increase we were seeing in stolen property being fenced through online companies such as Kijiji, Facebook and LetGo. Whereas traditional stolen property was usually fenced through pawnshops, technology has now provided the means for quickly dispersing stolen property through legitimate websites with relative anonymity.
Two protestors have been awarded damages after police used plastic ties to restrain them and detained them longer than necessary. In Godin v. City of Montreal, 2017 QCCA 1180, three plaintiffs were amongst a group of 60 to 70 other protestors occupying a small and densely populated tent city in Montreal’s Victoria Square in support of the “Occupy Wall Street” movement. Municipal authorities ordered the public park, which included Victoria Square, closed on a 24-hour basis. An order to leave was given by the Montreal police and most of the protestors left voluntarily and peacefully. However, about a dozen people, including the three plaintiffs, refused to leave and attached themselves to each other and a tent. They were arrested — two of the plaintiffs had their hands bound behind their backs with plastic tie wraps and were held in a heated bus parked at the site for about 20 to 60 minutes. Following their arrest, the plaintiffs were photographed and the back of one hand was marked with a number in black felt pen and invisible ink, which could be viewed under a special light in the event that the black ink is erased or blurred (for the purposes of identification). In the experience of the police, some people refuse to identify themselves or provide a false name and so the numbers allow the police to match the person arrested with any possessions seized from them. As well, the numbers provide easy identification should the arrestees return to occupy the square upon their release from custody. The ink would ordinarily be gone from the hand in three days. An extensive video recording was also made by the police of the entire operation. One of the plaintiffs, Godin, was released on site (his car was parked nearby) but the two others, Haugh and O’Callaghan, were placed in the back of police cars, still bound by plastic ties, and driven to other parts of the city. This prolonged their detentions for about 20 minutes.All three plaintiffs sued the City of Montreal, seeking damages for bodily, moral or material injury under the Civil Code of Quebec for, among other things, marking their hands with invisible and black ink, taking photos of them during their detention, and for the duration and manner of their detention, including the cuffing of their hands with plastic ties and their transport to other parts of the city.A Court of Quebec judge dismissed the plaintiffs’ actions. He found the plaintiffs failed to demonstrate the police did not act reasonably. In the judge’s view, the techniques used and the force applied were not excessive, given the necessity of physically removing the plaintiffs from the square, their persistent refusal and their passive resistance. Marking their hands with invisible and black ink was not offensive in the context of a mass arrest. As for the binding of the hands behind the back with plastic tie wraps, the judge found this to be a lawful common practice. The judge ruled that the detention in a heated bus was, in the circumstances, reasonable. The taking of the plaintiffs’ photos following their arrest was for the purposes of identification. And, even if the police did commit a fault, the plaintiffs suffered no damage and any discomfort experienced by them was minor and temporary.The plaintiffs appealed the trial judge’s decision to the Quebec Court of Appeal. Marking the handsThe Court of Appeal found that marking the hands with ink was momentary and minimal, did not penetrate the skin, and did not interfere with the plaintiffs’ physical, psychological or emotional integrity in more than a fleeting manner. Nor was there any suggestion that the plaintiffs were bothered or suffered psychologically beyond the fact of their arrest by the markings. The police committed no wrong. And, even if they did, there was no material damage proven. Photographing Although there was no statutory authority for the taking of the plaintiffs photos, since they were only arrested for a by-law infraction, the police may nonetheless “take a photo of people they arrest as part of their duty to retain evidence of the offence (i.e. the identity of the alleged perpetrators)... A photo simply records in visual form what a sketch or notes of a detainee’s appearance would preserve in written form,” stated Justice Schrager, adding:A police officer acting reasonably would seek to preserve evidence of the offence, including the arrestees’ identity and appearance for the purposes of collecting evidence to present to a court. There was consequently no fault committed by the police in taking the photographs in question. [para. 39]Furthermore, no damages (bodily, material or moral) had been proven that might have resulted from the taking of the photos after arrest. Plastic tie wrapsThe two plaintiffs who had their hands bound with plastic tie wraps argued this was unnecessary because they were co-operative. The police, on the other hand, contended that the binding was necessary to prevent the detainees from rubbing out the black ink numbers marked on their hands and as a security concern. “Police officers, acting reasonably, may handcuff an arrested person for reasons of security or to execute their duties,” said Justice Schrager. “Even though handcuffing may arise upon arrest, the fact of arrest, even if legal, does not automatically give rise to the right to apply handcuffs to a detained person… Handcuffing should not be carried out systematically. Applying handcuffs (or tie wraps) is within the discretion of an arresting officer but there must be a good reason to do it, such as the security of the police or others, including the arrestee.”In this case, the initial binding of the hands was not unreasonable. However, the plaintiffs’ continued restraint in the back seat of police cars with their hands bound when they were taken off the bus was unreasonable. At this point, the police had already decided not to charge the two plaintiffs.Detention durationThe Court of Appeal found the plaintiffs’ detentions in the bus for 20 to 60 minutes was not unreasonable. However, the prolonged detention once they were off the bus constituted a fault by police. Once it was decided the plaintiffs would be released, their continued detention was not necessary and the police were therefore obliged to release them:Though the police do not operate a taxi service, if having resolved to release the [plaintiffs], the police really felt the necessity to remove [the plaintiffs] out of the area of Victoria Square to avoid a re-occupation of the square, they could have uncuffed them and offered to drive them home. Instead, they left them handcuffed and transported them without consent to a distant point. This constitutes a fault in what was otherwise reasonable action on the part of the police. [para. 58]DamagesIn assessing damages, the Court of Appeal awarded Haigh and O’Callaghan, the two plaintiffs who were zip tied and transported to other parts of the city, $2,000 each with interest for moral and material loss related to the inconvenience of the transport and discomfort of the tie wraps. As for Godin’s detention, the third plaintiff, it was not prolonged and he was not handcuffed so no damages were awarded. However, his initial order to pay legal costs was reversed given the public interest questions involved in this case.Mike Novakowski is Blue Line’s case law columnist. He can be contacted at
Mental toughness can mean the difference between life and death in the realm of law enforcement. Those who reject the notion of “giving up” are more likely to survive a life threatening situation and better handle precarious situations.
Our firearms as police officers are significant pieces of our culture and what we do. It is hard at times not to allow it to define us, especially when it is unexpectedly removed after an incident involving a shooting for example. What is the message we receive when, after having discharged our firearm in an incident, we are ushered into a room, secluded and stripped of our firearm? There is good reason for this of course, as the firearm that was used may need to be tested and forensically investigated, but the experience and chronology of its removal can be very challenging.
I was talking to some HR people the other day who were musing about the increased focus on employee well-being in recent years. Some reflected with a chuckle about the “good old days” when they thought everything would be peachy once they offered something like R2MR (Road to Mental Readiness) training to the masses.
A few months ago Blue Line co-hosted a private roundtable on protecting smart cities, sponsored by BlackBerry and hosted at Deloitte’s downtown Toronto office. The day saw a number of chiefs, deputy chiefs and IT (information technology) policing personnel assemble to discuss — in an open dialogue — innovation and technology in public safety.
How do you watch someone else live your worst nightmare? How do you manage that emotionally?
There is no need to establish a causal connection between a driver’s blood alcohol content (BAC) and the death of a third party resulting from an accident on charge under s. 255(3.1) of the Criminal Code.
Mental training is as critical as physical training for law enforcement officer preparedness and hardihood. Not only does frontline law enforcement come with the obvious physical risks, it has also been referred to as the most dangerous job emotionally and psychologically.
Progress — that unstoppable, onward movement. It doesn’t come without a few bumps in the road. Progress guarantees change and that can be challenging in the workplace, especially in an industry with a long history like law enforcement.

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