Ford has revealed the all-new Police Interceptor Utility, set to take to the streets in 2019. The lineup will include Police Responder Hybrid Sedan, F-150 Police Responder, Expedition SSV, F-150 SSV, Transit PTV and SSV Plug-In Hybrid Sedan.
Intermotive makes plug-in modules that allow you to control your vehicle. 
XS Sights has revealed its DXT2 Big Dot Night Sights for front sight visibility in all lighting conditions.
The patented FRAMM is a unique weapon stock that allows operatives to comfortably discharge their firearms while wearing a ballistic helmet with the visor fully lowered (ballistic visors and gas masks).
Sig Sauer is now manufacturing pistol and rifle ammunition components for precision handloaders at its ammunition facility in Jacksonville, Ark.
The Be Weapon solution by STid was developed in 2012 for the French special forces and later for police departments. It is an equipment management and tracking solution with RFID tags.
Founded in 1789, Rostaing is the French pioneer, designer and manufacturer of protective technical gloves for activities from the most dangerous to the most technical and precise.
Tiger Tough Tactical seat covers are built specifically for law enforcement vehicles. They are made out of 1000 denier “ballistic” nylon and have an extra layer of reinforcement over the lower lumbar area of the seat-back cover.
In the event of an emergency, time is of the essence, and having the right information available could be lifesaving.
Wiivv custom insoles are what you need to do your duty in comfort.
The Nightstick Dicata ‘Intrinsically Safe’ headlamp was designed for fire helmets and hard hats, but also to function without interfering with face shields.
New for Fall 2018, the LaCrosse Cold Snap boot is suited for late season hunting, ice fishing or simply getting outdoors in the winter.
Anyone who has ever been employed by a correctional employer anywhere in the world knows gang and other criminal activity does not stop when the offenders are arrested and brought into custody. Offenders and gang leaders find various creative ways to continue their criminal enterprise from behind the walls of correctional institutions. Three-way calling to arrange business transactions, using a third party to traffic contraband and arrange for outside deals, and even human trafficking are only a few ways that offenders and gang leaders continue to communicate and run their criminal enterprise from behind the prison walls.
Some of the most renowned nitpickers to frequent a police training venue would be the drill instructors, closely followed by equitation personnel.
Back in 1989 when Blue Line was first published, technology in law enforcement was a fairly primitive affair, and much of the daily work centred around paper —  lots of it. Most patrol officers carried a briefcase filled with numerous five- or six-part reports, which used thin carbon-paper inserts to transfer the hand-written word through to the parts below.
Despite the reasonable manner in which a strip search was conducted, its location nevertheless rendered it a s. 8 Charter breach. In R. v. Pilon, 2018 ONCA 959 the police obtained a warrant under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act to search a motel room. When police entered the room, they arrested all three of its occupants, including Pilon.
Once upon a time alcohol was banned in Canada. Initially the decision to ban alcoholic beverages was done by individual communities in the late 19th century. In the early 20th century, it was done by some provinces, and then there was a nation-wide prohibition from 1918 to 1920.
As we enter the new year, we often come up with a fresh look at what we would like to change in our lives. As I look around at the people in this world and how they go about achieving their goals, I notice there are two approaches typically taken:
Armor Your Self: How to Survive a Career in Law EnforcementBy John Marx; 2017, 433 pagesISBN: 978-1544661810
Silence is a peculiar and multi-faceted concept. Studies demonstrate silence in its purest form is beneficial for the brain. We all need periods of silence to relax, rest, or reflect on things. Silence is linked to a number of virtues, such as respect, decorum and modesty. We hold a minute of silence out of deep respect for our fallen officers and troops. It is also an extremely powerful tool capable of conveying a strong message without a single word being spoken. Silence offers many positive effects but it can also have a dark side. This negative counterpart will be explored in this article.
Blue Line is kicking off 2019 in party mode: there’s 30 big candles on our cake to celebrate this month!
We would like to introduce Blue Line’s newest column, Behavioural Sciences, by Peter Collins, the operational forensic psychiatrist with the Ontario Provincial Police’s Criminal Behaviour Analysis Unit. Collins has an extensive background in violent crime and has worked with, as well as instructed, numerous criminal justice agencies in North America and beyond. This column will tackle modern behavioural issues in relation to law enforcement and seek to provide solutions through the latest research and tools, as well as stimulate discussion. Special thanks to Niagara Regional Police officer Robin Bleich for making the introduction.
It happens in every service in a variety of ways; our brothers and sisters sometimes end up in circumstances that take them away from the family in blue.
Taking control, conflict resolution and problem solving are key skills of law enforcement officers. When a community member’s problems exceed their ability to cope, no matter the breadth of the issue, the instinct and common practice is to call the police for a resolution. In the mind of many, the police have all the answers and the ability to meet their expectations.

Subscription Centre

New Subscription
Already a Subscriber
Customer Service
View Digital Magazine Renew

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website. By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. To find out more, read our Privacy Policy.