Blue Line

Features Editor’s Commentary
The necessity of change


September 30, 2021
By Brieanna Charlebois


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It’s no secret that a career in policing is stressful, uncertain and seemingly ever-evolving. For law enforcement officers, change is often unavoidable, but it can also foster adaptation and create exciting opportunities for growth and development.

There has perhaps been no greater change than with the advent and mass adoption of technology—and the pandemic only amplified our dependence on it. Unfortunately, this also comes with increased challenges for police, which is why this issue of Blue Line focuses on cybercrime and the use of technology in police work.

Our news includes a recap of the newly released report on cyber threats to Canada’s democratic process, the implementation of new technology called What3Words, a new way for Canadian first responders to locate the scene of an emergency, and features Halton police, the first service in Ontario to adopt electronic e-notes.

The CRTC recently mandated all Public Safety Access Points transition to Next Generation-911 technology by March 2024. So, this month’s Q&A features Peel Regional Police Deputy Chief Anthony Odoardi, chair of the OACP-led Next Generation-911 Inter-Agency Advisory Panel. He discusses what NG-911 means for the frontline, how agencies can optimize on the technology and what police and other emergency service organizations should be considering as they ready themselves for the change.

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Our cover story features the increase in human trafficking, how that intersects with cybercrime and the explosion of trafficking through online portals, particularly since the pandemic began (when borders closed and Canadians transitioned life online). Other features include a story on how drones are changing policing operations in Canada and the value of IP surveillance camera recordings in investigations.

On another note, but in keeping with the topic of change, it is with a heavy heart that I take this opportunity to announce this as my last issue as editor of Blue Line. I’d like to thank all of you, our readers, for welcoming and embracing me as editor over the past year. Though I have made the difficult decision to embrace change in the form of a new professional venture, I will never forget your kindness, dedication and tenacity. I am grateful for the lessons I’ve learned from you over this past year. Your resilience is inspiring.

Though I have made the difficult decision to embrace change in the form of a new professional venture, I will never forget your kindness, dedication and tenacity. I am grateful for the lessons I’ve learned from you over this past year. Your resilience is inspiring.

Though I had covered crime and policing in other capacities previously, through partnerships and fostering professional relationships—though most of them virtual—I was able to better understand the intricacies of the important work you do as officers. It has armed me with important knowledge that I will now be taking with me as I transition back into a more mainstream reporter-editor role. I now know the issues you’re most passionate about, the hurdles you face daily and the strides you, as law enforcement professionals, have made in recent years.

Now, for some good news! Please join me in welcoming Brittani Schroeder, who will be taking over as editor going forward. Brittani joined Annex (Blue Line’s parent company) in September. She graduated from Western University in 2017 with an honours specialization in English Language and Literature and a minor in Creative Writing. She then went on to earn a certificate in Publishing from Ryerson University. When not at work, Brittani enjoys going to the theatre to watch the latest Broadway musical, spending time at the beach, reading books, and relaxing with her husband and six-month-old puppy, Buffy. I am leaving you in good hands!

Once again, it was a pleasure writing for you and learning more about the crucial work you do as law enforcement officers. For this and so much more, thank you. Please feel free to reach out anytime, keep up the important work on the frontlines and take care of yourselves. We need you!


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