Health & Wellness
It can be tempting to stigmatize a previous or subsequent generation. It is often a reaction to fear of the unknown. Embracing a way of thinking or behaving in a way that is foreign to us can be daunting, as we are inclined to think and act according to what we know or believe to be true.
The topic of leadership is at the forefront of various models and strategic plans amongst law enforcement organizations. Despite being recognized as a key factor to success and human resource wellness, “leadership” remains an elusive and poorly understood subject, often blurred by a number of myths.
Silence is a peculiar and multi-faceted concept. Studies demonstrate silence in its purest form is beneficial for the brain. We all need periods of silence to relax, rest, or reflect on things. Silence is linked to a number of virtues, such as respect, decorum and modesty. We hold a minute of silence out of deep respect for our fallen officers and troops. It is also an extremely powerful tool capable of conveying a strong message without a single word being spoken. Silence offers many positive effects but it can also have a dark side. This negative counterpart will be explored in this article.
Taking control, conflict resolution and problem solving are key skills of law enforcement officers. When a community member’s problems exceed their ability to cope, no matter the breadth of the issue, the instinct and common practice is to call the police for a resolution. In the mind of many, the police have all the answers and the ability to meet their expectations.
A career in law enforcement is undoubtedly highly stressful with an elevated risk of experiencing life-threatening situations, traumatic incidents involving violence, fatal accidents and other death scenes.
Water is life. Over 60 per cent of the human body is composed of water. In fact, proper fluid replenishment is an essential part of health, proper body functioning and preventing dehydration.
We likely have all come across a disgruntled and jaded co-worker, someone overly preoccupied with spreading negativity. We may even have been in those shoes ourselves.
Vegan diets, blood type diets, liquid diets, lunar diets, werewolf diets, grapefruit diets — one cannot avoid being bombarded by the hype for the latest “revolutionary” and transformative diet proposal. The overwhelming number of fad diets emerging with “pseudo” scientific demonstrations can easily be confused with proven nutritional facts.
General Sir Samuel James Brown is credited with inventing the duty belt for tactical advantage after an unfortunate incident left him with one arm. Facing this physical disadvantage as a cavalry officer, he designed a belt with an additional leather strap to which he attached his weapons. This innovative concept — still referred to as the “Sam Browne” today — spread widely and made its way into police forces worldwide.
Projective studies astonishingly anticipate half of human kind will be overweight by the year 2030. Sadly, obesity kills over three million people worldwide annually, which is three times more than famine.
In my last column I explored the importance of adopting the right attitude towards work through the topic of epigenetics. The truth is that a great deal of our time is spent at work and that has repercussions on our health.
Unquestionably, every law enforcement officer and their loved ones can benefit from maximizing the probability of a long and healthy life.
Mental toughness can mean the difference between life and death in the realm of law enforcement. Those who reject the notion of “giving up” are more likely to survive a life threatening situation and better handle precarious situations.
Mental training is as critical as physical training for law enforcement officer preparedness and hardihood. Not only does frontline law enforcement come with the obvious physical risks, it has also been referred to as the most dangerous job emotionally and psychologically.
A recent study from Rand Europe had a startling finding: 33 per cent of the population in Canada is not getting enough sleep and that’s including children. The study went on to find experts estimate that lack of sleep costs the Canadian economy up to $21.4 billion a year due to decreased work productivity, including 80,000 working days lost per year.
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