News & Stories

A 2018 poll of Canadian professions by Insights West has found age seems to be an influence in how fellow Canadians view the job title of “police officer.”
The University of Regina’s Canadian Institute for Public Safety Research and Treatment (CIPSRT), a pan-Canadian consortium, is receiving $30 million over five years from the federal government to address first responders’ and public safety personnel’s mental health concerns.
The Manitoba government has announced plans to modernize its criminal justice system.
Blue Line Expo is featuring a new resiliency workshop this year.
The University of Phoenix has released the findings from its 2017 survey on first responder mental health, which surveyed 2,000 American adults who are employed as firefighters, police officers, EMT/paramedics and nurses. The survey not only revealed that a high percentage of first responders are dealing with traumatic events in their line of work, but also that many are also experiencing negative mental health symptoms.  
HALIFAX — She was a strong, well-spoken young woman who came from a loving home in western Nova Scotia.
It’s hard to remember exactly what happened. There was a bright flash followed by a loud bang and somehow you ended up on the ground. You reach for the source of pain and are surprised to find blood seeping through your uniform. Thankfully, backup is right behind you, EMS is ten minutes away and the nearest fully equipped trauma room is 30 minutes down the road.
To say that police officers who are mothers have “a lot on their plate” is to put it mildly. Our research on the experiences of these women — who we have come to call “police mothers” —  speaks to the systemic disadvantage that these women face.
Police officers in Ontario first start their careers by attending Ontario Police College (OPC) in Aylmer, a post-hire training facility that first opened in 1963 and is regarded as a leader in policing education. In fact, OPC is one of the largest police training facilities in North America, with over 8,000 recruits, police officers and civilian personnel attending the college each year.
Congratulations to all the winners of Blue Line’s Best Dressed Police Vehicle Awards, which showcases innovative, sustainable and effective designs. We look for clear identification, graphic designs that enhance visibility, design elements that show directionality of travel and effective integration of equipment and controls. Thank you to everyone who submitted and stay tuned for 2019’s call for submissions.
This year is a significant one for pursuit-rated police vehicles in Canada. We lost a few vehicles from the 2017 tests and we gained some new ones.
Possible issues with exhaust leaks into police SUVs have caused concern for police officers and led to investigations by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). No recalls have been issued and investigators have not yet determined a conclusive cause, but the aerodynamics of SUVs in general make these types of vehicles more prone to sucking in fumes from the back. Even the smallest unplugged hole in the rear body or floor area can cause intake of dangerous levels of carbon monoxide (CO) gas under certain conditions.
Chris Barratt is the interim national president for the International Police Association - Canada Section (IPA Canada). Denis Nadeau has resigned due to health challenges. Barratt is also the president of IPA Canada, Region 2.
Alex Vacca has been promoted to the rank of deputy sheriff in Portage la Prairie, Man., with the Central Plains District of the Government of Manitoba (Detachment 2IC). His roles include judicial policing and enforcement of court orders.
Peterborough Police Service Chief Murray Rodd will be retiring on June 30, 2018, after 10 years in the role.
John Bates, the 25th chief of the Saint John Police Force, has announced his intention to retire this spring.
Insp. Edmund Oates is now a superintendent and will lead Royal Newfoundland Constabulary’s Operational Patrol Services Division in the NEA region (Northeast Avalon).
The Ontario Chiefs of Police Association welcomes Antje McNeely, deputy chief at Kingston Police, and Chief Shawn Devine of North Bay Police Service to its board of directors.


When you ask a police service what they want in a patrol car, they don’t even hesitate, says OPP officer Mike Bennett. But when it comes to off-highway vehicles, it’s another story. That’s where Bennett and his company Terra Tech Off Road come in, and his latest reveal — a beefed up side-by-side called the Guardian — shows law enforcement agencies all the different types of product they can get to suit their off-road needs.
On April 19, 2016, an Ottawa police officer was injured during an altercation on the job. Exactly one year later, Const. Michael McNaught found himself on CBC’s Dragons’ Den. Today, he’s back with Ottawa Police Service — while still managing his marketplace business, RVezy. He shares how entrepreneurship helped in his recovery and complements his policing, too.
Twenty years ago the Innisfil Police Service and Bradford West Gwillimbury Police amalgamated as the South Simcoe Police. Chief Andrew Fletcher — who started his law enforcement career at Halton Regional Police — shares his thoughts on community mobilization and handling lean budgets.
The Dakota Ojibway Police Service (DOPS) snuffed out 40 candles on its birthday cake this year. It is a recognized self-administered agency located in southern Manitoba, serving the Birdtail Sioux, Canupawakpa Dakota, Long Plain First Nation, Roseau River, Sandy Bay and Waywayseecappo First Nation communities. Acting Chief Rick Head provides insight on what it’s like to lead one of the longest operating First Nation police services in Canada.
Weyburn Police Service is currently celebrating 60 years since its rebirth. Chief Marlo Pritchard gives Blue Line the details on the unique “split service” history and lessons he’s learned from his 35 years in law enforcement, including time as a civilian police officer in the United Nations mission in Kosovo.Q: You’ve been chief for five and a half years now. Coming from Regina to a smaller city, what would you say has been your most memorable moment?The welcoming aspect was special — seeing how the community reached out to introduce themselves and inviting me to different functions. I probably hadn’t even been here a week and I had a number of individuals stop by and have ‘tea with the chief.’ It was something you don’t see in a bigger service very often, I think, so I found it very interesting. Q: Why did you choose law enforcement as a career path?That is a funny story because at first I really had no interest in law enforcement. You talk to a lot of people who were focussed on policing right from when they were little kids. I wasn’t one of those. Regina Police Service had their first school resource officer at my high school and he saw some potential in me and tried to keep me out of trouble. He encouraged me to consider policing as a career. So it was strictly because of the influence of that officer, Glen Kosar, and 35 years later I’m still here.Q: What is the toughest part of the job?There are a number of challenges when you become chief. You come from a different rank and now all of a sudden you’re the final say. You don’t have that safety net. You can get input from others but ultimately you have to make those final decisions. You’re dealing with different issues and priorities and trying to base that on experience as well as the needs of organization and the community.Q: How is being a police chief in Weyburn unique to other locations?When you’re a police chief in any community, you have to adapt your police services to meet the needs of that particular place. One community might have a gang issue — fortunately we do not — and another one may have something different, but a lot of the trends I saw in Regina, we see here, too. We’re probably more fortunate in one aspect, as a smaller community, and that’s that we can often take our time. In bigger services, just because of demand, you can’t always spend the time that you’d like and need to on the files. We were also voted in as the fifth best place to live in Canada — and it really is a great community to live in and police in. There is a huge amount of support.Q: You completed two tours of duty as a civilian police officer in the United Nations mission in Kosovo. Can you share any lessons from this role that you carried with you to Weyburn?This experience shaped my thinking and I realized the importance of the rule of law. When I was in Kosovo, it was shortly after the war, and there was definitely a disruption of the rule of law — things we take for granted, like vehicle registrations, government functions, parking rules. You would see spontaneous violence because of the lingering issues in a post-conflict zone. I also took away the important of working with the community because without that support, we’re really just an occupying force. You need a community connection to police because that’s what we are — an extension of the community. Q: How is Weyburn Police celebrating its 60th anniversary this year?We have rebranded with new shoulder flashes and we’re updating our cars over the next year or so. We held a two-day open house and that was a phenomenal turnout — we lost count after 2,000. We had tours and one constable has developed a video of our history ( Donations were collected for our local youth centre — we were able to raise almost $1,400. From the feedback, the community really appreciated it. At the end of September we are also having an Emergency Services Ball, a black tie event. We’re partnering with fire and EMS and, while we’ve had ‘policeman balls’ before, maybe 20-25 years ago, I think this is probably the first time all the emergency services have come together for a ball. Q: Anything from the force’s history that is surprising?What’s unique about the Weyburn Police is its split service. It started back when Weyburn became a city in 1913 with Chief Const. Blaikie as chief until 1933. The department disbanded in 1944 and it went to the RCMP. Historically, no one knows why. There is a lot of speculation it was because of resourcing due to the Second World War. We haven’t been able to find any documentation, though. Twelve years later the city council decided they wanted to go back and reinstitute their own police service and so on July 1, 1957, the Weyburn Police was established again under the leadership of James E. McCardle. Also, we were one of the first Saskatchewan services to complete in-car cameras about 18-19 years ago. One of our own, Const. Jeffery Bartsch, was the first Canadian police officer to run a full marathon in uniform and he’s still going strong with that. Weyburn Police Service was also highlighted in Reader’s Digest in the late 1990s or early 2000s, as an interesting side note, for its community policing and Reader’s Digest staff came out and did a ride-along. Q: What would you say are the most pressing challenges for the Canadian policing community?There’s no doubt in my mind that we are not really capturing what is happening to the Canadian economy or the true number of victims from cybercrime. A lot of these kinds of reports are going straight to banks, not police agencies. Then there are jurisdictional issues because many of these perpetuators are residing offshore. How do you disrupt them? How do you hold them accountable? The technology to work on these challenges and the costs of that are also quite phenomenal.Q: What kinds of changes would you like to see in Canadian policing?We’re seeing a slow evolution of policing because of the changes in technology and the demands from the communities. You’re seeing an increased need for more blending of specializations, etc. The days of small town police services trying to do it all are gone. You’re outsourcing many different things and I think bigger agencies will end up doing that, too. The boundaries of Weyburn Police, for example, and Estevan Police are blended and we work much more closely together now than in the past — just for efficiencies. I think that will expand.
It all started with Samuel Port, William Brown, Charles Bussette and Henry Goodenough back in 1867. Since then the Windsor Police Service has aged right alongside Canada. Blue Line checks in with Chief Al Frederick for more on the force’s 150th celebrations, his 33 years in policing, advice for the next generation and his views on the legalization of marijuana.
There were jokes, fidget spinners and plenty of options presented as career avenues to the curious student body at the 15th annual justice career fair, hosted in partnership by the Association of Black Law Enforcers (ABLE) and the University of Guelph-Humber, in north Toronto last week.
At the 22nd annual Fraud and Anti-Counterfeiting Conference earlier in December, law enforcement and private industry came together to discuss the problem of counterfeiting, identify tactics to pursue against counterfeiters and new resources, and learn how to work together to protect Canadian industries.
Blue Line attended Panasonic Toughbook’s Mobility Forum 2017 last week for a look at new technology and inspirational words from former Canada Forces chief of defence staff Rick Hillier.
Friends of the OPP Museum, a non-profit organization that supports and promotes the museum, hosted its 2017 Pedal for the Past event on September 30, 2017, in Midland, Ont. at Sainte-Marie Among the Hurons historic site.
“Policing in a Digital Society – Risks and Opportunities” was the theme of the 112th national Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP) conference, which was held earlier this week in Montréal.
“You are all my stars,” said Larry Cappetto to the packed Cineplex theatre in Toronto on June 19 after a special film screening. “You’re the reason I’m doing what I’m doing — capturing courage.”

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