Police chiefs want power to seize guns, drugs in mail

September 03, 2015
Aug 30 2015 OTTAWA - Canada's police chiefs want legal authority to seize mail in transit to stem the flow of illicit drugs, fake medicine and weapons through the postal system. In a recently passed resolution, the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police say contraband is being sent through the mail "with impunity'' because the law forbids officers from swooping in until a parcel arrives at its destination. This poses a "significant challenge'' for police, who must find "alternative ways to work within or around'' the system to apprehend criminals, the chiefs say.

Aug 30 2015

OTTAWA - Canada's police chiefs want legal authority to seize mail in transit to stem the flow of illicit drugs, fake medicine and weapons through the postal system.

In a recently passed resolution, the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police say contraband is being sent through the mail "with impunity'' because the law forbids officers from swooping in until a parcel arrives at its destination.

This poses a "significant challenge'' for police, who must find "alternative ways to work within or around'' the system to apprehend criminals, the chiefs say.

The resolution calls on the government to amend the legislation governing Canada Post to provide police with the ability to obtain a judge's approval to "seize, detain or retain parcels or letters'' in the mail stream.

Canada Post delivered more than nine billion parcels and letters to some 15 million addresses in Canada last year. International mail flows through large plants in the Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal areas.

A November 2012 report the RCMP prepared for the chiefs' organized crime committee revealed that firearms, grenades, a rocket launcher, stun guns, dangerous chemicals and drugs including cocaine, heroin and marijuana were sent through the mail.

"These items represent a significant threat to postal workers and Canadians,'' say the chiefs, who passed the resolution this month at their annual conference in Quebec City.

"It is imperative that Canada Post and the law enforcement community develop ways to effectively work together to stop the transmittal of contraband through the postal system.''

The 2012 report noted counterfeit items - from fake Olympic hockey sweaters to bogus passports - were also being shipped into Canada via the post office.

It called for greater collaboration between police and postal officials to detect suspect parcels.

However, in a background document accompanying the new resolution, the chiefs say recent court rulings have declared that postal inspectors cannot act as agents of the state when tipped by police to contraband making its way through the post.

The chiefs plan to write a letter to the federal public safety minister urging changes to the law, hopefully to be followed up with a meeting.

In addition, members of the chiefs' drug committee plan to discuss the issue with Canada Post representatives in order to further develop the chiefs' strategy for legislative amendments. The chiefs also seek the co-operation of federal, provincial and territorial justice officials.

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