Oh Cannabis, we stand on guard for thee!

Morley Lymburner
March 13, 2014
By Morley Lymburner
It's the thin edge of the wedge. Three US states have legalized marijuana and now Canada has pulled the pin on the hand grenade in a friendly game of catch. Police have to shoulder some of the blame. Back in 2001 the federal health minister took a humanitarian approach toward those suffering chronic pain and other afflictions by permitting them to smoke "medical" marijuana. In his haste to win popularity with some segments of society he created a monster that still haunts us today on many levels and fronts. More recently, to gain a foothold with a younger voter, Justin Trudeau suggested its time to drop all laws pertaining to marijuana. Many politicians and top police managers are unwilling to continue expending the resources on investigating and processing federal marijuana charges. With all police agencies trying to do much more with much less it was inevitable that something would give. When the GWO (Great Wizard of Ottawa) can see a division in police leaders across the country, it's a sure bet that it's time for the 'legalize dope' agenda.

It's the thin edge of the wedge. Three US states have legalized marijuana and now Canada has pulled the pin on the hand grenade in a friendly game of catch. Police have to shoulder some of the blame.

Back in 2001 the federal health minister took a humanitarian approach toward those suffering chronic pain and other afflictions by permitting them to smoke "medical" marijuana. In his haste to win popularity with some segments of society he created a monster that still haunts us today on many levels and fronts. More recently, to gain a foothold with a younger voter, Justin Trudeau suggested its time to drop all laws pertaining to marijuana.

Many politicians and top police managers are unwilling to continue expending the resources on investigating and processing federal marijuana charges. With all police agencies trying to do much more with much less it was inevitable that something would give. When the GWO (Great Wizard of Ottawa) can see a division in police leaders across the country, it's a sure bet that it's time for the 'legalize dope' agenda.

The rush to pass the 2001 legislation came without any empirical evidence that marijuana will work as claimed. Doctors and researchers not only have no idea what quantities to prescribe but are also on the hot seat with patients who demand cannabis but have no evidence, other than the 'pot-heads' word on it, that it works.

Well let the politicians put this in their pipe and smoke it. Why does this "medication" have to be smoked? Could it not be given in pill form, injection or maybe even as a suppository? Was the overwhelming evidence of the dangers of second hand smoke considered? Can users smoke it in public?

How do you tax something that is so easy for everyone to grow? Will we be replacing cops for Revenue agents? Are we increasing costs on medicare? Are we ready for the additional loss of life on the roads? Are we ready for increased psychiartic care and the colateral costs to families?

The genie is out of the bottle and police across the country will have to deal with it. Every law enforcement agency will now have to admit that we ain't going back. The problem arises when ill-conceived regulations that don't work are mixed with the political attitude that police can always be counted upon to make bad rules work.

My recommendation is to {not} make it work this time. This is the future and Canadian police now have to change their lobbying techniques to meet the problems of the future. Legalizing the drug does not take away the problems it causes.

Study after study has shown that cannabis distorts an individual's ability to judge time and distance – two crucial requirements to safely drive a motor vehicle. THC adheres to fat molecules in the body and will not purge from the system as efficiently as alcohol. Ever heard of a druggy going on a diet? That burns fat.

There are several things we must do before we even consider legalizing.

[ 1 ] All certificates authorizing drug use must be made reverse-onus, requiring the applicant to prove effectiveness.There are few doctors who could not be intimidated into issuing the current forms – and no drug traffickers (or bikers) who will not try.

[ 2 ] Alcohol and driving don't mix. Drugs and driving also don't mix. Alcohol, drugs and driving is insane. Legislation is needed to permit mandatory blood tests of all motorists who appear to be impaired but have little or no alcohol in their system.

[ 3 ] Mandatory blood tests of motorists whose vehicles smell of cannabis. Similar to the road-side screening laws this will be the only weapon that will work to gain back some semblance of control on the highways.

[ 4 ] Legislation to suspend the licence of anyone given a prescription to use marijuana. Use it legally and you forfeit the privilege to drive on public roads. It's just too scary otherwise.

[ 5 ] A minimum licence suspension of two years for persons found guilty of driving while impaired by THC, with the suspension staying until blood samples indicate it has dropped to a low level. A zero reading is preferable but that would make politicians run scared.

The goal here is to make driving as clean as possible. If people partaking in amateur sports must prove they are drug free to run, jump, swim, skate or ski then a blood test to drive is not too much to ask.

While the politicians pontificate about the virtues of pot perhaps they might try an experiment. Let officers enforce the current anti-marijuana campaigns by issuing tickets to users in much the same manner as provincial offences.

Simple possession results in confiscation and a ticket with an out of court fine of $250. Better yet create a quota system for enforcement with a five per cent commission to officers and the customer base will shrink dramatically.

Tear that Maple Leaf out of our flag. We all know what to replace it with – and many politicians want you to be ready to salute.

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